Sunday, 3 May 2015

SQLcl - Cloud connections via Secure Shell tunnels

We're always trying to make SQLcl easier to connect to your database, whether its at your place or in the cloud.  So, one other thing we have added to enable you to drill into your cloud databases is an SSHTUNNEL command.  Lets take a look at the help for it, which you can get as follows.

SQL> help sshtunnel
SSHTUNNEL
---------

Creates a tunnel using standard ssh options 
such as port forwarding like option -L of the given port on the local host 
will be forwarded to the given remote host and port on the remote side. It also supports
identity files, using the ssh -i option
If passwords are required, they will be prompted for.

SSHTUNNEL <username>@<hostname> -i <identity_file> [-L localPort:Remotehost:RemotePort]

Options

-L localPort:Remotehost:Remoteport

Specifies that the given port (localhost) on the local (client) host is to be forwarded to 
the given remote host (Remotehost) and port (Remoteport) on the remote side.  This works by 
allocating a socket to listen to port on the local side.
Whenever a connection is made to this port, the connection is forwarded over 
the secure channel, and a connection is made to remote host & remoteport from 
the remote machine.

-i identity_file
Selects a file from which the identity (private key) for public key authentication is read. 


SQL> 


So for this to work we need to decide which ports locally we are going to use and which remote machine and port we want to use to map our ports from local to remote.  We also need a RSA file from the target host.  In this example, we have created one with the default name of id_rsa.  

The format of the flags follow the standard ssh rules and options, so -i for identity files and -L for port forwarding.  Heres an example connecting to a remote host via a tunnel.

(bamcgill@daedalus.local)–(0|ttys000|-bash)–(Mon May 04|12:16:46)
(~/.ssh) $sql /nolog

SQLcl: Release 4.1.0 Release Candidate on Mon May 04 00:16:58 2015

Copyright (c) 1982, 2015, Oracle.  All rights reserved.


SQL> sshtunnel bamcgill@gbr30060.uk.oracle.com -i ./id_rsa -L 8888:gbr30060.uk.oracle.com:1521

Password for bamcgill@gbr30060.uk.oracle.com ********
ssh tunnel connected

SQL> connect barry/oracle@localhost:8888/DB11GR24
Connected

SQL> select 'test me' as BLRK from dual weirdtable

BLRK  
-------
test me


SQL> 


You can download SQLcl from OTN here and give this a try when the next EA is released.

Friday, 1 May 2015

SQLcl - Code editing on the console

We've been playing with our console drawing in SQLcl for a while now and this week, we hooked up some keys to make editing and running much easier.  The video will show the following keys for managing your buffer in the console.  This will make it into the next Early Access candidate soon.

  • up arrow - previous history (this will continue to show you the next history unless you move into the text to edit it.
  • down arrow - next history which is the same as above.
If we are editing and not showing history, then the up and down arrow will move up and down the buffer. 
  • ctrl-W will take you to the top left of the buffer and ctrl-S will take you to the bottom of the buffer.
  • left arrow moves right, with ctrl-A taking you to extreme left of that line
  • right arrow moves right and ctrl-E takes you to the extreme right of that line
  • ESC takes you out of edit mode, back to the SQL> prompt
  • ctrl-R will execute your buffer if you are editing it.

Editing SQL in SQLcl

At the start of the video, we paste in a large piece of SQL from Kris' blog and all NBSP get stripped out so you get the full SQL and none of the dross. 

If you are at the end of the buffer and terminate your statement correctly, the next CR will run the contents of your buffer.  If you are anywhere else in the buffer, ctrl-R will run the buffer for you.

Check out the latest one on OTN and come back for these features when we drop the new version of SQLcl on OTN.

Thursday, 30 April 2015

SQLcl connections - Lazy mans SQL*Net completion

Turloch posted this today, which is like aliases for SQL*Net connection URL's which are used to connections like this:

connect <USERNAME>/<Password>@URL


This works great and you can simplify your connection strings that you use.  Vadim wired this into the code completion and we can now code complete via key, a connection string that you have used before or you can set up a new now using the net command.


Friday, 20 February 2015

Connections Types in SQLcl


We support many ways to connect in SQLcl, including lots from SQL*Plus which we need to support to make sure all your SQL*Plus scripts work exactly the same way using SQLcl as with SQL*Plus.

I've added several ways to show how to connect to SQLcl.  If there is one you want to see added that is not here, let me know and I'll add it to the list.  So far, We have below:
  • EZConnect
  • TWO_TASK
  • TNS_ADMIN
  • LDAP
At any time when connected you can use the command 'SHOW JDBC'  to display what the connection is and how we are connected.  Here's some details of the types above.

EZCONNECT

The easy connect naming method eliminates the need for service name lookup in the tnsnames.ora files for TCP/IP environments.  It extends the functionality of the host naming method by enabling clients to connect to a database server with an optional port and service name in addition to the host name of the database:

 $sql barry/oracle@localhost:1521/orcl  
 SQLcl: Release 4.1.0 Beta on Fri Feb 20 10:15:12 2015  
 Copyright (c) 1982, 2015, Oracle. All rights reserved.  
 Connected to:  
 Oracle Database 12c Enterprise Edition Release 12.1.0.2.0 - 64bit Production   
 SQL>   

TWO_TASK

The TWO_TASK (on UNIX) or LOCAL (on Windows) environment variable can be set to a connection identifier. This removes the need to explicitly enter the connection identifier whenever a connection  is made in SQL*Plus or SQL*Plus Instant Client. 

In SQLcl, we can set this up as a jdbc style connection like this


$export TWO_TASK=localhost:1521/orcl  




TNS_ADMIN


Local Naming resolves a net service name stored in a tnsnames.ora file stored on a client.  We can set the location of that in the TNS_ADMIN variable.

 $export TNS_ADMIN=~/admin  

An example tons entry is shown here below.

 $cat tnsnames.ora   
 BLOG =  
 (DESCRIPTION =  
 (ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=tcp)(HOST=localhost)(PORT=1521) )  
 (CONNECT_DATA=  
 (SERVICE_NAME=orcl) ) )  

we can then use the entry to connect to the database.

 $sql barry/oracle@BLOG  
 SQLcl: Release 4.1.0 Beta on Fri Feb 20 10:29:14 2015  
 Copyright (c) 1982, 2015, Oracle. All rights reserved.  
 Connected to:  
 Oracle Database 12c Enterprise Edition Release 12.1.0.2.0 - 64bit Production   
 SQL>   

LDAP

We've already written about LDAP connections here.  Here's a quick review.

  set LDAPCON jdbc:oracle:thin:@ldap://scl58261.us.oracle.com:389/#ENTRY#,cn=OracleContext,dc=ldapcdc,dc=lcom   


 $export LDAPCON=jdbc:oracle:thin:@ldap://scl58261.us.oracle.com:389/#ENTRY#,cn=OracleContext,dc=ldapcdc,dc=lcom   
 $sql /nolog  
 SQLcl: Release 4.1.0 Beta on Fri Feb 20 10:37:02 2015  
 Copyright (c) 1982, 2015, Oracle. All rights reserved.  
 SQL> connect barry/oracle@orclservice_test(Emily's Desktop)   
 Connected  
 SQL>   

If we have more types to add, then they will appear here.  Let us know what you want to see.

Thursday, 19 February 2015

Code Insight on SQLcl

Here's a little preview of the code insight we have in SQLcl.  These changes are part of EA2 which are coming out very soon.  This also shows the buffer and cursor management which was introduced in SQLcl


This allows you to move around the buffer easily and add and change text as you would in a normal text editor, not a console window like this.

We're also adding hotkeys to run the buffer from anywhere or to jump out of the buffer to do something else without losing the contents of the buffer.

Stayed tuned for this soon.
B

Friday, 23 January 2015

SQLCl - LDAP anyone?

since  we released our first preview of SDSQL, we've made  a lot of changes to it and enhanced a lot of things too in there so it would be more useable.  One specific one was the use of LDAP which some customers on SQLDeveloper are using in their organisations as a standard and our first release precluded them from working with this.

Well, to add this, we wanted a way that we could specify the LDAP strings and then use them in a connect statement.  We introduced a command called SET LDAPCON for setting the LDAP connection.  You can set it like this at the SQL> prompt
 set LDAPCON jdbc:oracle:thin:@ldap://scl58261.us.oracle.com:389/#ENTRY#,cn=OracleContext,dc=ldapcdc,dc=lcom  

or set it as an environment variable
 (~/sql) $export LDAPCON=jdbc:oracle:thin:@ldap://scl58261.us.oracle.com:389/#ENTRY#,cn=OracleContext,dc=ldapcdc,dc=lcom  

Then you can come along and as long as you know your service name, we're going to swap out the ENTRY delimiter in the LDAP connection with your service.  We're working on a more permanent way to allow these to be registered and used so they are more seamless.

In the meantime, you can then connect to your LDAP service like this
 BARRY@ORCL>set LDAPCON jdbc:oracle:thin:@ldap://scl58261.us.oracle.com:389/#ENTRY#,cn=OracleContext,dc=ldapcdc,dc=lcom  
 BARRY@ORCL>connect barry/oracle@orclservice_test(Emily's Desktop)  
 Connected  
 BARRY@PDBOH12>tables  
 Command=tables  
 TABLES   
 TEST    

Here's a qk little video of it in action!  You can then use  the 'SHOW JDBC' command to show what you are connected to.


This is the latest release which should be online soon, and you  can download it from here.

Friday, 12 December 2014

SDSQL - Editing Anyone?

Since we dropped our beta out of SQLDeveloper 4.1 and announced SDSQL, we've been busy getting some of the new things out to users.  We support SQL*plus editing straight out of the box, but one thing that was always annoying was the time when you make a mistake and can't fix it to you have finished typing to go back and add a line like this.


This was always the way as console editors didn't let you move around, the best you could hope for on the command line was a decent line editor and anything above was printed to the screen and not accessible unless through commands like you see here in the images about..

Well, not any more.  In SDSQL we've taken a look at several things like history, aliases and colors and we've now added a separate multiline console editor which allows you to walk up and down your buffer and make all the changes you want before executing?  Sounds normal, right? So, thats what we did.  Have a look and tell us what you think.